Delegation on Incarceration, Detention, and Political Prisoners




LEARN MORE ABOUT THE MAY 2017 DELEGATION!

May 13 – 26, 2017

Incarceration, Detention, and Political Prisoners
Interfaith Peace-Builders
Co-Sponsored by Defense for Children International – Palestine

This delegation is your chance to explore Palestinian and Israeli efforts to achieve peace with justice and delve deeper into the issues of detention and incarceration, the Israeli military court system, and political prisoners.

Connect with leaders of the No Way To Treat A Child Campaign and gain knowledge and resources to organize against child detention and related issues. As with all IFPB delegations, you will also meet additional Israelis and Palestinians working for peace and justice as well as visit many impotant historical sites.

Get updates about this delegation, including how to apply to join, financial aid, and how we’ll support your advocacy after this life-changing experience.

SIGN UP TO LEARN MORE at Interfaith Peace-Builders

Founded in 2001, Interfaith Peace-Builders is an independent 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization working to build movements of solidarity with grassroots struggles for justice in Palestine/Israel. IFPB delegates root their activism in the realities of Palestine/Israel. We build bridges and build movements. Join us!

Breaking: Berkeley Divests from G4S


Palestinian Rights Groups Cheer Berkeley’s Decision to Divest from Private Prisons

Friends of Sabeel – North America, FOSNA Voice, July 22, 2016

To see if your city invests or has a contract with G4S, or to launch a campaign, contact Rochelle@fosna.org.

Berkeley, CA, July 19, 2016 — The City of Berkeley will divest from corporations that operate private prisons and will push Wells Fargo and other firms to follow suit, according to a resolution passed unanimously by the City Council Tuesday night.

Enlace, an alliance of low-wage worker centers, unions, and community organizations, and the Afrikan Black Coalition, representing black students in the University of California and California State University systems, brought the issue to Berkeley’s Peace and Justice Commission in June. The commission found that “private prisons have been linked to numerous cases of violence including sexual abuse, beatings, turning a blind eye to gang violence among inmates, denial of food and medical attention, and atrocious conditions,” and urged the council to divest from corporations including GEO Group, Corrections Corporation of America, and G4S.

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Ben Ehrenreich Writes a Love Letter to Palestine

Next we meet Hani Amer, whose farm lay on the route of the infamous wall. After a long struggle, Amer won the right to have his house and some of his land preserved . . . The Israeli Army built a gate that they opened for 15 minutes every 24 hours. . . Most disturbing is “planet Hebron,” where the list of abuses considered normal includes soldiers firing tear gas at schoolchildren to mark the beginning and end of each day of school.

BEN RAWLENCE, The New York Times, July 14, 2016

Children playing in the Shati refugee camp in Gaza City in 2007 (Ruth Fremson/The New Yorkr Times)

An intimate, vivid look at daily life in Palestine

THE WAY TO THE SPRING
Life and Death in Palestine
By Ben Ehrenreich
Illustrated. 428 pp. Penguin Press. $28.

“It is perhaps unavoidable and surely unfortunate that any book about the region between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea requires introduction, and some small degree of defensiveness on the part of the author.” So writes Ben Ehrenreich, a journalist and novelist, in the (avoidable) introduction to his love letter to Palestine, “The Way to the Spring.”

I say avoidable because, as Ehren­reich acknowledges on the same page, the current debate about Israel-Palestine is virulently partisan. His exposition of the politics of storytelling (“choosing certain stories and not others means taking a side”) and the task of the writer (“to battle untruth”) is eloquent, though I fear more likely to deter than move those who have already made up their minds on the issue. His cause would be better served by letting his stories do the talking, for they are both heartbreaking and eye-opening.

The book begins with Bassem Tamimi, whom Ehrenreich met in 2011. Bassem is a resident of the village of Nabi Saleh in the West Bank, which had been holding weekly demonstrations against the Israeli occupation — protesting the grabbing of the village spring (its water supply) and the arrest and detention of villagers, as well as the death of one of them, a 13-year-old boy. The intimacy of Ehrenreich’s reporting domesticates the violence and injustice, thus rendering it more shocking: A fragment of a tear gas grenade and broken lawn furniture mingle beneath a fruiting mulberry tree in the garden. Children proudly show where an Israeli bullet scarred one of the rooms. Bassem’s wife, Nariman, reads Dan Brown in Arabic translation outside, at night, watching the brake lights of cars at the checkpoint down the hill.

The people of Nabi Saleh are among the few who still regularly protest and resist the occupation, and Ehrenreich accompanies them on marches, getting tear-gassed more times than I can count. But this is not the story he has come for, not the only one he is interested in. He spends enough time among the family of Bassem and others to realize that “the people of Nabi Saleh were crafting a narrative of their own struggle.” They needed “to see themselves a certain way.” And this is the heart of the book: the stories people tell themselves to survive.

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Israeli Court Rules to Keep Palestinian Clown in Jail Without Trial

Mohammed Abu Saha’s arrest sparked an international campaign by circus performers for his release. Though no charges have been filed against him, Shin Bet claims he’s a member of the PFLP terrorist group.

Haaretz, Jun 13, 2016


Mohammed Abu Saha, a circus performer and teacher, has been under administrative detention since December 14, 2015

  • IN PHOTOS: Palestinians take protesting to the circus

  • Israel holding Palestinian circus performer in detention without trial for three months

  • Mohammed Abu Saha, a Palestinian circus clown and trainer will be held without trial for another six months, the Palestinian Circus School near Ramallah in the West Bank reported on its Facebook page on Monday.

    Circus performers around the world have mobilized in support of Abu Saha, 24, who has been in an Israeli jail under administrative detention since December 14, 2015. His original six month detention was to have expired on Monday, if it was not renewed. 

    “No freedom for Abu Saha. Administrative detention order extended with another 6 months. Our hearts are heavy. May Abu Saha be granted the strength to endure this big injustice,” reads the Facebook post.

    The IDF has yet to comment on the matter.

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    Thank Rep. Mark Pocan for Speaking Up for Palestinian Children

    Just Foreign Policy, June 21, 2016

    Your Representative, Mark Pocan, was one of 20 signers of the Congressional letter to President Obama urging his administration to take steps to “address serious human rights abuses against Palestinian children living under Israeli military occupation.” The letter, organized by Rep. Betty McCollum, calls for a Special Envoy for Palestinian Youth to work with human rights organizations, the Israeli government and the Palestinian Authority to ensure that the rights of children are protected.

    According to a report from Defense of Children International-Palestine, three-quarters of detained Palestinian children suffer physical violence. As the lawmakers note, an ever-present fear of arrest, detention, and violence for Palestinian children both violates their human rights and serves to fuel the conflict.

    Please call Rep. Mark Pocan at (202) 225-2906. When you reach a staffer, mention that you are a constituent and thank them for using their power to uplift the human rights of the most vulnerable.

    And please share this video highlighting the human rights abuses Palestinian children face by the Israeli military occupation using the hashtags #700ChildPrisoners and #NoWayToTreatAChild.

    Thanks for all you do to help make U.S. foreign policy more just,

    Avram Reisman, Robert Naiman, and Sarah Burns
    Just Foreign Policy

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